Byte of Prevention Blog

by Samantha Cruff |

New Internet Explorer Bug Squashes Browser Reliability

computer bug

Internet Explorer (IE) has for years been the bane of the web developer’s existence. It’s refusal to cooperate with standard rules of coding causes anyone who uses IE to see web pages differently – meaning with less features – than the rest of the world.

This week, an IE security hole was discovered that could allow hackers to remotely access your computer. This means that even if you have really strong virus protection and firewall, someone can bypass them to attack your computer through IE.

Translation: using Internet Explorer to do anything right now opens your computer up to attack.

To make matters worse for Microsoft, they currently do not have a patch for this problem.

The issue is so bad that the Department of Homeland Security published a report announcing that they are “currently unaware of a practical solution to this problem.” Their site does provide a workaround that includes running command prompts. If the technical jargon makes your head spin, you shouldn’t be using IE since you can’t fix it.

Newer versions of IE aren’t safer. This bug affects IE 6 through 11.

If you are still running XP and its version of IE, you WILL NEVER receive a security patch. This means your computer and all of its files will remain vulnerable to hackers.

The bottom line is that IE is the most problematic browser on the market today because it does not adjust quickly or effectively. Microsoft also installs updates for its browser through the Windows Update program, and these updates may not install automatically depending on your computer settings.

Still not convinced? Check out this article listing seven reasons why Internet Explorer should never be used again.

Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox are much better maintained browsers. Apple’s Safari is also more secure and should be familiar to iPad users.

You’ll probably find features on any of these browsers that you didn’t realize you wanted until you try them. In this instance, change is not only more secure but also could be more productive.

You may think all of this is an overblown scare tactic regarding browser security.

Just remember nothing is scarier than discovering your computer – and all its confidential data – has been hacked.

Samantha Cruff is the Marketing Communications Coordinator at Lawyers Mutual. Contact Samantha for information regarding our available risk management publications at 800.662.8843 or samantha@lawyersmutualnc.com.

About the Author

Samantha Cruff

Samantha Cruff is the Marketing Communications Coordinator at Lawyers Mutual. Contact Samantha for information regarding our available risk management publications at 800.662.8843 or samantha@lawyersmutualnc.com.

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